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©2018 by Analog Out Media LLC

Reverie: Sweet As Edition Review

Updated: Jul 9, 2019




When I started Reverie I had no idea what to expect. I had not watched any game play footage of the game, all I had to go by was the cover/box art that was reminiscent of the Mother/Earthbound series, a series that I really enjoy. When I saw that a definitive edition, Reverie: Sweet As Edition, was coming to Nintendo Switch I figured it was finally time to give this little game that looked charming as hell a try.


Reverie opens with a small folklore story being told about the origin of Toromi Island and the spirits that reside there. There were 4 brothers sailing off the coast of the island, there was a mutiny, they throw one brother off the boat and all 4 of their spirits are doomed to the island. You play as Tai, a young boy visiting his grandparents on the island. That's about as much story as you get, but more on that later. You get to your grandparents, get a hold of a cricket bat, and find your grandfather's journal which he then instructs you to go out and write your own stories with your experiences.



I would classify this game as a Link to the Past clone. I consider that a compliment.

So you know how I said earlier that the art style was reminiscent of the Mother series? The similarities end with the art style. The second that I stepped into a dungeon I stopped, looked around and went “Oh this is a Legend of Zelda Link to the Past clone”. This is not a bad thing necessarily. I would classify this game as a Link to the Past clone. I consider that a compliment. You genuinely wouldn't be able to tell the difference if somebody slapped Zelda sprites over the dungeons of this game.


The dungeons in Reverie are fantastic. This game is so heavily focused on solving puzzles that I might actually categorize this as a puzzle game more than an adventure game. Think “Braid” being a puzzle game instead of really a platformer. I wouldn't consider myself the best person in the world at puzzle games but I'm pretty decent and several of the puzzles in Reverie had me totally stumped for several minutes. When I did finally solve the puzzles I had a great feeling of accomplishment. The dungeons are where Reverie truly shines.



When I did finally solve the puzzles I had a great feeling of accomplishment. The dungeons are where Reverie truly shines.

All that being said, Reverie is not a perfect game. My biggest complaint of the game is the music. The music is generally a short tune that loops over and over again in every different section of the game. It wasn’t grating but it was extremely noticeable as time went on. The other major problem I had with the game was the lack of story and the empty overworld. This is why earlier I mentioned that I would categorize this game more as a puzzle game than an adventure game. There are next to no secrets to explore in the overworld and likewise the interactions with NPCs are almost purely out of necessity to progress through the game. I was waiting and hoping for that classic Mother/Earthbound style of humor, and there was a little bit sprinkled throughout, but it never reached a level that seemed to give the game a real personality.



There are next to no secrets to explore in the overworld and likewise the interactions with NPCs are almost purely out of necessity to progress through the game

After everything is said and done, I really enjoyed Reverie: Sweet As Edition. It’s flaws aside, what I ended up with was a very tight, visually pleasing, and rewarding puzzle adventure game. Overall the main campaign took me around 4 hours to complete, and that’s a plus for me. It’s available for around $12 on the Nintendo E-Shop or if you’re so inclined you can grab a physical copy here. If you enjoy short sweet puzzle adventure games then definitely give Reverie a try, I think it is worth your time.



Verdict: 3/5 Try It